Being Safe, Being Me 2019

Being Safe, Being Me 2019

Results of the Canadian Trans & Non-binary Youth Health Survey

In 2014, SARAVYC conducted a bilingual survey to learn about the health of transgender youth in Canada. It was the first and largest of its kind in Canada. Five years later, in 2019, we conducted the same survey with a few additional questions and heard from 1,519 youth representing every province and territory in the country. Here’s a first glimpse at what they had to say.

 

 

Overview of the Report

Half of youth who took the survey (50%) are currently living in their felt gender all of the time, which is a significant increase from the 2014 survey. However, the majority of youth did not have their correct gender—the gender that accurately reflects their felt gender identity—listed on most identification cards and records.

 

 

In the past 12 months, almost half of youth missed out on physical health care they needed (43%), and almost three quarters (71%) did not get mental health services when they needed them.

 

 

Almost half of youth who took the survey (44%) have taken hormones to affirm their gender.

 

 

Most trans and/or non-binary youth (63%) reported experiencing severe emotional distress; however, those with supportive families, safe schools, and/or a legal name change were less likely to report severe emotional distress.

 

 

Sexual assault is a serious form of violence. More than 1 in 4 youth (28%) reported being physically forced to have sex when they did not want to, which was a significant increase from 2014 (23%).

 

 

Youth with supportive families and safe schools were much less likely to report suicidal thoughts. However, almost two thirds of the trans and/or non-binary youth who took the survey told us that they have self-harmed (64%) and/or seriously considered suicide (64%) within the past year.

 

 

The majority of trans and/or non-binary youth (70%) reported experiencing some form of discrimination in their lifetime. Youth were most likely to report they had experienced discrimination because of their sexual orientation (51%), their sex (53%), their physical appearance (45%), or their age (36%).

 

 

Approximately 74% of youth told us they avoided public washrooms for fear of being harassed, being seen as trans, or being outed. Out of 19 listed locations, youth in all provinces and territories reported public washrooms as the most commonly avoided location.

 

Youth were most likely to ask their trans friends (92%) followed by their nontrans friends (85%) to call them by their correct name or pronouns. These percentages have significantly increased since 2014, where 86% of youth asked their trans friends and 78% asked their non-trans friends 78%.

 

Being Safe, Being Me 2019 Webinar


 

Principal Investigator: Dr. Elizabeth Saewyc

Senior Post-doctoral Fellow: Dr. Ashley B. Taylor

Co-Investigators: Dr. Greta Bauer, Dr. Anita DeLongis, Dr. Jacqueline Gahagan, Dr. Dan Metzger, Dr. Tracey Peter, Dr. Annie Pullen Sansfaçon, Dr. Catherine Taylor, Dr. Julie Temple Newhook, Dr. Robb Travers, Dr. Jaimie Veale, and Dr. Kristopher Wells

Research Staff and Community Partners: Ace Chan, Mauricio Coronel Villabos, Dr. Hélène Frohard-Dourlent, Morgane Gelly, Stephanie Hall, Yeshvi Mehta, Shannon Millar, Cormac O’Dwyer, Dr. Françoise Susset

Thanks to Former Staff: Sophie MacLean, Monica Shannon, Dr. Jennifer Wolowic

Funding by: CIHR (Foundation Scheme) under the grant “Improving health equity for LGBTQ youth in Canada and globally: Addressing the role of families and culture”, 2017-2024

Recommendations

The following recommendations were developed in consultation with trans and non-binary advisory groups across Canada.

Youth in our advisory groups strongly emphasized the need to address inequities youth experience across all provinces and territories. Survey results show that in most areas of health, there are also some disparities between provinces and territories. Many of these disparities appear to be due to marked differences in provincial policy across the country. For example, gender affirming surgeries and hormones vary in terms of coverage, cost, and access across provinces and territories.

Trans and non-binary youth deserve equitable access to resources to help them grow and thrive, including but not limited to, gender affirming health care, safe schools, and supportive networks for themselves and their families. Despite protection for trans and/or non-binary youth in provincial human rights codes, the Canadian Human Rights Act, and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, discrimination on the basis of gender identity and gender expression persists. Provinces and territories should work toward ensuring:

  • Equitable coverage for gender affirming health care, surgery, and hormones
  • Safe and welcoming schools
  • Access to affirming legal documents and identification
  • Protection from discrimination and violence

There are significant barriers faced by trans and/or non-binary youth in accessing health care. Our advisory groups stressed the importance of health care workers who are knowledgeable about trans and/or non-binary care, and access to timely gender affirming care, but our survey data shows more work is needed. Many youth reported missing needed physical or mental health care, and were uncomfortable disclosing or discussing their trans and/or non-binary identities with health professionals.

Health care providers and clinics should work with trans and/or non-binary communities to ensure adequate and timely access to gender-affirming health care. Professionals from all health care disciplines who work with youth need opportunities to improve their competency in providing care that meets the professional standards of care from the World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH). This should include general education about gender identity and barriers in accessing health care, as well as discipline-specific training.

Youth advisories emphasized the need for access to safe washrooms and public spaces—a need that is clearly substantiated in our data. The majority of youth reported avoiding various public places such as gyms or pools, school locker rooms, and malls or clothing stores for
fear of being harassed or outed. The most avoided public location was public washrooms. This holds true in all regions of Canada.

Research shows that inclusive policies allowing people access to washrooms that best match their gender identity increases perceived safety and improves mental health outcomes. Laws and policies alone will not protect our trans and/
or non-binary youth. We also need increased public awareness and a society that values the dignity of trans and/or non-binary youth.

The youth advisories were clear and consistent in their request for inclusive sex education across Canada. Most youth who took the survey reported being sexually active. They deserve relevant and accurate sex education, where they can see themselves in the curriculum.

We recommend that sex education courses in all provinces and territories align with the most recent federal guidelines on sexual health education and include information specific to the needs of gender and sexual minorities, and are taught by instructors who are knowledgeable about gender and sexual minority people. Furthermore, in order to provide equal education and resources for trans and/or non-binary youth and to normalize diverse experiences of sexuality and gender for all students, sex education classes should not to be segregated by gender.

Regional Fact Sheets

Our trans and non-binary youth advisory groups also consulted on the following regional fact sheets. These fact sheets represent recommendations youth identified as important in their regions and are supported by findings from the survey.

Being Safe, Being Me 2019: Results of the Canadian Youth Trans and Non-binary Health Survey is a national study by SARAVYC that builds on a similar survey conducted by SARAVYC in 2014. Similar to the survey in 2014, this survey was available for young people to take in English or French and surveyed a range of topics including gender identity, access to gender-affirming care and physical health.

In 2019, 389 trans and/or non-binary youth in British Columbia took the survey. Of the youth in British Columbia who took part in the survey, 12% identified as Indigenous and 89% were born in Canada. The majority of trans and/or non-binary youth in British Columbia reported that they are living in their felt gender full-time (56%) or part-time (29%). Some youth, however, are never living in their felt gender (15%).

Key findings for youth in British Columbia

  • 23% do not feel safe inside their own home
  • 80% use a different name or pronoun from the one given at birth in everyday life
  • 42% feel that their parents care about them very much
  • 75% did not use a condom or latex barrier the last time they had sex

Recommendations for British Columbia

  1. Trans and/or non-binary resources for doctors, parents, and trans youth to increase competency instead of only for policy makers.
  2. Recognition for chosen name and pronouns, such as access to legal name change, correct pronouns on prescriptions and during appointments, and a field to indicate pronouns on forms (e.g. doctor’s office, schools, pharmacy, etc.).
  3. Sexual and gender minority sex education in school systems not segregated by gender to normalize and provide education and resources for queer and trans folks.

 
 
Download the British Columbia Info Sheet

 
Key contact: Dr. Elizabeth Saewyc
 

Being Safe, Being Me 2019: Results of the Canadian Youth Trans and Non-binary Health Survey is a national study by SARAVYC that builds on a similar survey conducted by SARAVYC in 2014. Similar to the survey in 2014, this survey was available for young people to take in English or French and surveyed a range of topics including gender identity, access to gender-affirming care and physical health.

In 2019, 281 trans and/or non-binary youth in Alberta took the survey. Of the youth in Alberta who took part in the survey, 16% identified as indigenous and 94% were born in Canada. The majority of trans and/or non-binary youth in Alberta reported that they are living in their felt gender full-time (47%) or part-time (38%). Some youth, however, are never living in their felt gender (15%).

Key findings for youth in Alberta

  • 77% have avoided public washrooms for fear of being read as trans, or being outed
  • 58% are not comfortable talking with their health practitioner about their trans and/or gender affirming health care needs
  • 66% do not feel safe in school washrooms
  • 31% do not have a family doctor or nurse practitioner

Recommendations for Alberta

  1. Improve access, reduce barriers, and reduce fear and anxiety to physical spaces such as washrooms.
  2. Inclusive and mandatory sexual health education taught by instructors with gender and sexual minority competency.
  3. More knowledge health care providers and more accessible gender affirming care and surgeries.

 
 
Download the Alberta Info Sheet

 
Key contact: Dr. Kristopher Wells
 

Being Safe, Being Me 2019: Results of the Canadian Youth Trans and Non-binary Health Survey is a national study by SARAVYC that builds on a similar survey conducted by SARAVYC in 2014. Similar to the survey in 2014, this survey was available for young people to take in English or French and surveyed a range of topics including gender identity, access to gender-affirming care and physical health.

In 2019, 57 trans and/or non-binary youth in the Prairie Provinces took the survey. Of the youth in Prairie Provinces who took part in the survey, 16% identified as Indigenous and 95% were born in Canada. The majority of trans and/or non-binary youth in the Prairie Provinces reported that they are living in their felt gender full-time (41%) or part-time (44%). Some youth, however, are never living in their felt gender (15%).

Key findings for youth in Prairie Provinces

  • 87% have experienced discrimination based on their sexual orientation
  • 94% have an emotional or mental health concern that has lasted at least 12 months
  • 66% of youth do not usually feel safe in school washrooms

Recommendations for Prairie Provinces

  1. Gender neutral washrooms in school are integral to the safety and dignity of trans and/or non-binary youth.
  2. Competent, accessible and low-cost mental and emotional health services for trans and/or non-binary youth.
  3. Decrease public transphobia and homophobia through public education campaigns. Law enforcement should take reports of homophobia and transphobia seriously.

 
 
Download the Prairie Provinces Info Sheet

 
Key contact: Dr. Tracey Peter
 

Being Safe, Being Me 2019: Results of the Canadian Youth Trans and Non-binary Health Survey is a national study by SARAVYC that builds on a similar survey conducted by SARAVYC in 2014. Similar to the survey in 2014, this survey was available for young people to take in English or French and surveyed a range of topics including gender identity, access to gender-affirming care and physical health.

In 2019, 337 trans and/or non-binary youth in Ontario took the survey. Of the youth in Ontario who took part in the survey, 10% identified as Indigenous and 89% were born in Canada. The majority of trans and/or non-binary youth in Ontario reported that they are living in their felt gender full-time (45%) or part-time (41%). Some youth, however, are never living in their felt gender (14%).

Key findings for youth in Ontario

  • 73% needed mental health services in the past year but did not get care
  • 72% do not feel their family cares about their feelings
  • 84% never participated in physical activities with a coach outside of school
  • 87% do not feel comfortable discussing their trans and/or gender affirming health care needs with a health practitioner they do not know

Recommendations for Ontario

  1. Knowledgeable, affirming and accessing health care services and providers.
  2. Public education of the importance of using the correct pronouns and chosen names, including the consequences of not doing so.
  3. Improve outreach and support for families to help them understand their trans and/or non-binary youth and to help youth feel safe at home.

 
 
Download the Ontario Info Sheet

 
Key contact: Dr. Robb Travers
 

Being Safe, Being Me 2019: Results of the Canadian Youth Trans and Non-binary Health Survey is a national study by SARAVYC that builds on a similar survey conducted by SARAVYC in 2014. Similar to the survey in 2014, this survey was available for young people to take in English or French and surveyed a range of topics including gender identity, access to gender-affirming care and physical health.

In 2019, 220 trans and/or non-binary youth in Quebec took the survey. Of the youth in Quebec who took part in the survey, 6% identified as Indigenous and 91% were born in Canada. The majority of trans and/or non-binary youth in Quebec reported that they are living in their felt gender full-time (53%) or part-time (37%). Some youth, however, are never living in their felt gender (10%).

Key findings for youth in Quebec

  • 15% had to change schools due to lack of support for their gender identity
  • 70% have avoided public restrooms for fear of being harassed, read as trans, or outed
  • 62% could not think of anything they are really good at
  • 46% are comfortable talking to their healthcare practitioner about being trans or non-binary

Recommendations for Quebec

  1. Train school staff to help students and teachers navigate and adapt to gender identity.
  2. Create mental health programs for trans youth in mental health and have less centralized and more visible safe spaces.
  3. Urgent and important need for gender neutral restrooms and locker rooms.

 
 
Download the Quebec Info Sheet

 
Key contact: Dr. Annie Pullen Sansfaçon
 

Being Safe, Being Me 2019: Results of the Canadian Youth Trans and Non-binary Health Survey is a national study by SARAVYC that builds on a similar survey conducted by SARAVYC in 2014. Similar to the survey in 2014, this survey was available for young people to take in English or French and surveyed a range of topics including gender identity, access to gender-affirming care and physical health.

In 2019, 223 trans and/or non-binary youth in Atlantic Provinces took the survey. Of the youth in Atlantic Provinces who took part in the survey, 11% identified as Indigenous and 95% were born in Canada. The majority of trans and/or non-binary youth in Atlantic Provinces reported that they are living in their felt gender full-time (52%) or part-time (37%). Some youth, however, are never living in their felt gender (12%).

Key findings for youth in Atlantic Provinces

  • 22% have run away from home
  • 30% attempted suicide in the past year
  • 57% have experienced discrimination in Canada based on their sex
  • 471% needed emotional or mental health services in the past year but did not get them

Recommendations for youth in Atlantic Provinces

  1. Implement accessible and knowledgeable mental and physical health care services and providers.
  2. Provide support and education for families to help them understand their trans and/or non-binary youth and to help youth feel safe at home.
  3. Develop training for teachers, school counsellors, and administrators on gender identity development and gender-affirming approaches to make schools a safer place for all youth.

 
 
Download the Atlantic Provinces Info Sheet

 
Key contact: Dr. Jacquie Gahagan
 

Being Safe, Being Me 2019: Results of the Canadian Youth Trans and Non-binary Health Survey is a national study by SARAVYC that builds on a similar survey conducted by SARAVYC in 2014. Similar to the survey in 2014, this survey was available for young people to take in English or French and surveyed a range of topics including gender identity, access to gender-affirming care and physical health.

In 2019, 149 trans and/or non-binary youth in rural communities took the survey. Of the youth in rural communities who took part in the survey, 17% identified as Indigenous and 96% were born in Canada. The majority of trans and/or non-binary youth in rural communities reported that they are living in their felt gender full-time (47%) or part-time (40%). Some youth, however, are never living in their felt gender (13%).

Key findings for rural youth

  • 39% have experienced cyber bullying in the past year
  • 60% have never taken hormones to affirm their gender
  • 19% smoked a cigarette in the past month
  • 42% did not get physical health care when needed because they did not want their parents to know
  • 14% did not get medical help when needed because the service is not available in their community

Recommendations for rural youth

  1. Increase trans and/or non-binary competencies for medical professionals in rural areas.
  2. Develop robust online services to help link trans and/or non-binary youth with services and information relevant to their area.
  3. Provide and/or improve transportation options from rural areas to places where they can access resources, doctors, and support groups.

 
 
Download the Rural Info Sheet

 
Key contact: Dr. Elizabeth Saewyc
 

ÊTRE EN SÉCURITÉ, ÊTRE SOI-MÊME 2019

Résultats de l’enquête canadienne sur la santé des jeunes trans

En 2014, le SARAVYC a conduit une enquête bilingue pour en apprendre sur la santé des jeunes transgenres au Canada. C’était la première et la plus grande du genre au Canada. Cinq ans plus tard, en 2019, nous avons conduit la même enquête avec quelques questions additionnelles et entendu 1519 jeunes qui représentent toutes les provinces et territoires du pays. Voici un premier aperçu de ce qu’iels avaient à dire.

 

 

Note linguistique

Le pronom neutre « iel·s » remplace les pronoms « il·s » et « elle·s » afin de rendre la langue aussi neutre que possible quand nous nous référons à des personnes. Dans le même esprit, le pronom démonstratif neutre « celleux » remplace les pronoms « ceux » et « celles », et le pronom « elleux » remplace « elles » et « eux ». Le pronom possessif neutre « ma·on » remplace le pronom « mon » et « ma » et l’article défini « le·a » remplace les article « le » et « la ».

Sommaire

La moitié des participant·e·s (50 %) vivent actuellement en tout temps dans le genre qu’iels ressentent, ce qui représente une nette augmentation comparativement à l’enquête de 2014. Chez la plupart des jeunes, toutefois, leurs papiers d’identité et documents d’identification n’indiquait pas le bon genre, c’est-à-dire celui représente le mieux leur identié de genre ressentie.

 

 

Au cours des 12 mois précédents, près de la moitié des jeunes n’ont pas pu recevoir les soins de santé physique dont iels avaient besoin (43 %) et près des trois quarts (71 %) n’ont pas obtenu les services de santé mentale quand iels en avaient besoin.

 

 

Près de la moitié des participant·e·s (44 %) ont déjà pris des hormones pour affirmer leur genre.

 

 

La plupart des jeunes trans ou non-binaires (63 %) ont indiqué avoir souffert d’une grande détresse émotionnelle, mais celleux bénéficiant du soutien de leur famille, fréquentant des écoles sûres ou ayant changé de prénom officiel étaient moins susceptibles de signaler un tel niveau de détresse émotionnelle.

 

 

Une agression sexuelle est une forme de violence grave. Plus d’un·e jeune sur quatre (28 %) a signalé avoir été forcé·e physiquement à avoir des relations sexuelles contre son gré, ce qui constitue une hausse significative par rapport à 2014 (23 %).

 

 

Les jeunes bénéficiant du soutien de leur famille et fréquentant des écoles sécuritaires risquaient beaucoup moins d’indiquer avoir eu des pensées suicidaires. Cependant, près de deux tiers des jeunes trans et/ou non-binaires qui ont répondu à l’enquête ont indiqué qu’iels s’étaient automutilé·e·s (64 %) et/ou qu’iels avaient pensé à se suicider (64 %) au cours de la dernière année.

 

 

La majorité des jeunes trans ou non-binaires (70 %) ont été victimes d’une certaine forme de discrimination au cours de leur vie. Les jeunes étaient plus susceptibles d’attribuer la discrimination à leur sexe (53 %), à leur orientation sexuelle (51 %), à leur apparence physique (45 %) ou à leur âge (36 %).

 

 

Environ 74 % des jeunes avaient évité les toilettes publiques par crainte qu’on les harcèle, qu’on les perçoive comme une personne trans ou que leur identité trans ne soit “outée” ou découverte. Parmi les 19 lieux énoncés, les jeunes de l’ensemble des provinces et territoires ont indiqué que les toilettes publiques étaient le lieu le plus souvent évité.

 

Les jeunes étaient plus enclin·e·s à avoir demandé à leurs ami·e·s trans (92 %), puis les personnes non trans qui sont leurs ami·e·s (85 %) de s’adresser à elleux en utilisant un prénom différent. Ces chiffres ont beaucoup augmenté depuis 2014.

 

Webinaire présentant les résultats de l’Enquête canadienne sur la santé des jeunes trans 2019


 

Chercheure principale : Dr. Elizabeth Saewyc

Boursière postdoctorale supérieure : Dr. Ashley B. Taylor

Cochercheur·e·s : Dr. Greta Bauer, Dr. Anita DeLongis, Dr. Jacqueline Gahagan, Dr. Dan Metzger, Dr. Tracey Peter, Dr. Annie Pullen Sansfaçon, Dr. Catherine Taylor, Dr. Julie Temple Newhook, Dr. Robb Travers, Dr. Jaimie Veale, and Dr. Kristopher Wells

Personnel de recherche et chercheur·e·s en milieu communautaire : Ace Chan, Mauricio Coronel Villabos, Dr. Hélène Frohard-Dourlent, Morgane Gelly, Stephanie Hall, Yeshvi Mehta, Shannon Millar, Cormac O’Dwyer, Dr. Françoise Susset

Remerciements aux anciennes membres du personnel : Sophie MacLean, Monica Shannon, Dr. Jennifer Wolowic

Financement : CIHR (Foundation Scheme) under the grant “Improving health equity for LGBTQ youth in Canada and globally: Addressing the role of families and culture”, 2017-2024

Recommandations

Nous présentons un certain nombre de recommandations éclairées par les résultats de l’enquête et les commentaires de nos groupes consultatifs de jeunes trans et/ou non-binaires à travers le Canada.

Les jeunes de nos groupes consultatifs ont fortement insisté sur la nécessité de s’attaquer aux iniquités dont font l’objet les jeunes de l’ensemble des provinces et territoires. Les résultats de l’enquête montrent qu’il existe également des disparités dans les secteurs de la santé d’une province ou d’un territoire à l’autre, dont un grand nombre serait attribuable à des différences marquées dans les politiques provinciales en vigueur à travers le pays. À titre d’exemple, la couverture de la chirurgie affirmative du genre et des hormones, leurs coûts et l’accès à celles-ci ne sont pas les mêmes dans tou·te·s les provinces et territoires.

Les jeunes trans et/ou non-binaires méritent d’avoir un accès équitable aux ressources qui leur permettront de grandir et de s’épanouir, ce qui comprend notamment des soins en matière de santé affirmative du genre, des écoles sécuritaires et un réseau de soutien pour les jeunes et leurs familles. Malgré la protection que procurent aux jeunes trans et/ou non-binaires les lois en matière de droits de la personne des provinces et territoires ainsi que la Loi canadienne sur les droits de la personne et la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés, la discrimination fondée sur l’identité et l’expression de genre perdure. Les provinces et territoires doivent déployer des efforts pour garantir :

  • une couverture équitable en matière de soins de santé affirmatifs du genre, de chirurgie et d’hormones;
  • des écoles sécuritaires et accueillantes;
  • l’accès à des documents légaux et papiers d’identité qui indiquent le bon genre;
  • des protections contre la discrimination et la violence.

Les jeunes trans et/ou non-binaires se heurtent à d’importants obstacles en ce qui a trait à l’accès aux soins de santé. Nos groupes consultatifs ont souligné à quel point il est important que les professionnel·le·s de la santé soient bien informé·e·s quant aux soins à prodiguer aux personnes trans et/ou non-binaires, ainsi que sur l’accès à des soins de santé affirmatifs du genre sans délais importants. Les résultats de notre enquête montrent qu’il reste des lacunes à combler à ce niveau. De nombreux·ses jeunes ont indiqué ne pas avoir reçu les soins de santé physique ou mentale dont iels avaient besoin, de même que leur malaise devant la nécessité de dévoiler leur identité trans ou non-binaire à des professionnel·le·s de la santé ou d’en parler avec elleux.

Les professionnel·le·s de la santé et les cliniques doivent travailler de concert avec les communautés trans et non-binaires en vue d’offrir un accès convenable et opportun à des soins de santé affirmatifs du genre. Les professionnel·le·s de toutes les disciplines de la santé qui œuvrent auprès des jeunes doivent avoir la possibilité d’accroître leurs compétences en matière de soins affirmatifs du genre qui répondent aux normes professionnelles de soins édictées par l’Association professionnelle mondiale pour la santé des personnes transgenres (ou WPATH). Cela devrait comprendre une formation générale sur l’identité de genre et les obstacles à l’accès aux soins de santé, ainsi qu’une formation propre à leur discipline.

Les groupes consultatifs de jeunes ont mis l’accent sur le besoin d’avoir accès en toute sécurité aux toilettes et espaces publics – une nécessité nettement corroborée par nos données. La plupart des jeunes ont indiqué qu’iels évitent divers lieux publics, comme les gymnases ou les piscines, les vestiaires d’écoles, de même que les centres commerciaux et les boutiques de vêtements par crainte qu’on les harcèle ou que leur identité trans soit révélée. Le lieu public le plus évité? Les toilettes publiques. Cette situation reste vrai dans toutes les régions du pays.

Les recherches montrent que des politiques inclusives donnant aux personnes accès à des toilettes qui correspondent à leur identité de genre rehaussent le sentiment de sécurité et ont un impact positif sur la santé mentale. Les lois et les politiques ne sont pas en mesure, à elles seules, de protéger les jeunes trans et/ou non-binaires. Nous devons également sensibiliser davantage le public et cultiver au sein de la société le respect de la dignité des jeunes trans et/ou non-binaires.

Les jeunes consulté·e·s ont clairement demandé l’accès à une éducation sexuelle inclusive partout au Canada. La majorité des jeunes ayant répondu à cette enquête ont indiqué avoir une vie sexuelle active. Ces jeunes méritent de recevoir une éducation sexuelle pertinente et précise, dans laquelle iels se reconnaissent.

Nous recommandons que dans l’ensemble des provinces et territoires, les cours d’éducation sexuelle concordent avec les plus récentes lignes directrices fédérales en matière d’éducation à la santé sexuelle, que ces cours comprennent des informations propres aux besoins des minorités sexuelles et de genre, et que cette formation soit assurée par des enseignant·e·s qui connaissent bien la réalité des personnes appartenant à ces minorités. De plus, afin d’offrir aux jeunes trans et/ou non-binaires une éducation et des ressources équitables et afin d’uniformiser les diverses expériences de sexualité et de genre auprès de tou·te·s les élèves, les cours d’éducation sexuelle ne doivent pas être ségrégués selon le genre.

Fiches d’information régionales

Nos groupes consultatifs de jeunes trans et non-binaires ont aussi consulté les fiches descriptives régionales suivantes. Ces fiches descriptives représentent les recommandations identifiées par les jeunes comme étant importantes dans leur région et qui sont appuyées par les résultats de l’enquête.

En 2019, 389 jeunes trans et/ou non-binaires ont répondu à l’enquête en Colombie-Britannique. Environ 12 % se sont identifié·e·s en tant qu’Autochtones et 89 % sont né·e·s au Canada. La plupart des jeunes trans et/ou non-binaires vivent à temps plein (56 %) ou à temps partiel (29 %) dans le genre qu’iels ressentent. Cependant, certain·e·s jeunes ne vivent jamais dans leur genre ressenti (15 %).

Résultats clés

  • 23 % des jeunes ne se sentent pas en sécurité chez elleux.
  • 80 % des jeunes utilisent dans leur vie de tous les jours un prénom ou des pronoms différents de ceux qui leur a été donné à leur naissance
  • 42 % des jeunes pensent que leurs parents se préoccupent de leur bien-être
  • 75 % des jeunes n’ont pas utilisé un préservatif ou une barrière de latex lors de leur dernière relation sexuelle.

Recommandations

  1. Des resources sur les identités trans et nonbinaires pour les fournisseur·se·s de soins, les parents et les jeunes trans pour augmenter le niveau de compétences au-delà des législateur·rice·s.
  2. La reconnaissance des prénoms et pronoms choisis par les jeunes, ce qui comprend l’accès au changement de prénom officiel, l’usage des bons pronoms sur les ordonnances et pendant les rendez-vous, ainsi qu’un champ pour indiquer les pronoms sur les formulaires (e.g., chez le docteur, à l’école, à la pharmacie, etc.)
  3. Une éducation à la sexualité adaptée aux minorités sexuelles et de genre qui ne soit pas séparée selon le genre, afin de normaliser et d’offrir des informations et ressources aux personnes queer et trans.

Note linguistique

Entre autres adaptations grammaticales, le pronom neutre « iel·s » remplace les pronoms « il·s » et « elle·s » afin de rendre la langue française aussi neutre que possible quand nous nous référons à des personnes. La recherche de la neutralité du genre est nécessaire pour assurer le respect de l’autodétermination des jeunes ayant participé au projet de recherche.
 
 
Télécharger

 
Chercheure principale : Dr. Elizabeth Saewyc
 

En 2019, 281 jeunes trans et/ou non-binaires ont répondu à l’enquête dans l’Alberta. Environ 16 % se sont identifié·e·s en tant qu’Autochtones et 94 % sont né·e·s au Canada. La plupart des jeunes trans et/ou non-binaires vivent à temps plein (47 %) ou à temps partiel (38 %) dans le genre qu’iels ressentent. Cependant, certain·e·s jeunes ne vivent jamais dans leur genre ressenti (15 %).

Résultats clés

  • 77 % des jeunes ont évité des toilettes publiques par crainte qu’on les harcèle, qu’on les perçoive comme une personne trans ou qu’on découvre leur identité trans
  • 58 % des jeunes ne sont pas à l’aise pour parler avec leur fournisseur·se de soin de leurs besoins en santé affirmative du genre ou de soins liés à leur identité trans
  • 66 % des jeunes ne se sentent pas en sécurité dans les toilettes de leur école
  • 31 % des jeunes n’ont pas de médecin généraliste ou de infirmier·ère praticien·ne

Recommandations

  1. Réduire les craintes et anxiétés liés aux espaces publiques en améliorant leur accès en toute sécurité, comme par exemple les toilettes.
  2. Éducation à la sexualité inclusive et obligatoire, enseignée par des personnes qui ont des compétences en matière de diversité sexuelle et de genre.
  3. Des fournisseur·se·s de soins mieux formé·e·s et un meilleur accès aux soins et aux opérations chirurgicales affirmatives du genre.

Note linguistique

Entre autres adaptations grammaticales, le pronom neutre « iel·s » remplace les pronoms « il·s » et « elle·s » afin de rendre la langue française aussi neutre que possible quand nous nous référons à des personnes. La recherche de la neutralité du genre est nécessaire pour assurer le respect de l’autodétermination des jeunes ayant participé au projet de recherche.
 
 
Télécharger

 
Cochercheur : Dr. Kristopher Wells
 

En 2019, 57 jeunes trans et/ou non-binaires ont répondu à l’enquête dans les provinces des Prairies. Environ 16 % se sont identifié·e·s en tant qu’Autochtones et 95 % sont né·e·s au Canada. La plupart des jeunes trans et/ou non-binaires vivent à temps plein (41 %) ou à temps partiel (44 %) dans le genre qu’iels ressentent. Cependant, certain·e·s jeunes ne vivent jamais dans leur genre ressenti (15 %).

Résultats clés

  • 87 % des jeunes ont subi de la discrimination en raison de leur orientation sexuelle ou identité de genre
  • 94 % des jeunes avaient un problème de santé mentale ou émotionnelle qui duraient depuis au moins 12 mois
  • 66 % des jeunes ne se sentent pas en sécurité dans les toilettes de leur école

Recommandations

  1. Des toilettes unisexes dans les écoles car elles sont essentielles pour la sécurité et la dignité des jeunes trans et/ou non-binaires.
  2. Accès à des services de santé mentale compétents et abordables pour les jeunes trans et/ou non-binaires.
  3. Réduction de la transphobie et de l’homophobie à travers des campagnes d’éducation. La police devrait prendre au sérieux les signalements d’homophobie et de transphobie

Note linguistique

Entre autres adaptations grammaticales, le pronom neutre « iel·s » remplace les pronoms « il·s » et « elle·s » afin de rendre la langue française aussi neutre que possible quand nous nous référons à des personnes. La recherche de la neutralité du genre est nécessaire pour assurer le respect de l’autodétermination des jeunes ayant participé au projet de recherche.
 
 
Télécharger

 
Cochercheure : Dr. Tracey Peter
 

En 2019, 337 jeunes trans et/ou non-binaires ont répondu à l’enquête dans l’Ontario. Environ 10 % se sont identifié·e·s en tant qu’Autochtones et 89 % sont né·e·s au Canada. La plupart des jeunes trans et/ou non-binaires vivent à temps plein (45 %) ou à temps partiel (41 %) dans le genre qu’iels ressentent. Cependant, certain·e·s jeunes ne vivent jamais dans leur genre ressenti (14 %).

Résultats clés

  • 73 % des jeunes ont eu besoin de services de santé mentale au cours de la dernière année mais n’ont pas accédé à ces soins
  • 72 % des jeunes ne pensent pas que leur famille se soucie de leurs émotions
  • 84 % des jeunes n’ont jamais participé à une activité physique menée par un·e entraîneur·se hors de l’école
  • 87 % se sont pas à l’aise pour discuter de leur besoins en santé affirmative du genre ou liés à leur identité trans avec un·e fournisseur·se de soins qu’iels ne connaissent pas

Recommandations

  1. Accès à des services de santé et des fournisseur·se·s de soins qui soient bien formé·e·s et qui affirment le genre.
  2. Des campagnes d’éducation sur l’importance de l’usage des bons pronoms et des prénoms choisis, y compris sur les conséquences de ne pas les utiliser.
  3. Amélioration des programmes d’accompagnement et de soutien pour les familles afin de les aider à comprendre leurs jeunes trans et/ou non-binaires et de les aider à se sentir en sécurité à la maison.

Note linguistique

Entre autres adaptations grammaticales, le pronom neutre « iel·s » remplace les pronoms « il·s » et « elle·s » afin de rendre la langue française aussi neutre que possible quand nous nous référons à des personnes. La recherche de la neutralité du genre est nécessaire pour assurer le respect de l’autodétermination des jeunes ayant participé au projet de recherche.
 
 
Télécharger

 
Cochercheur : Dr. Robb Travers
 

En 2019, 220 jeunes trans et/ou non-binaires ont répondu à l’enquête au Québec. Environ 6 % se sont identifié·e·s en tant qu’Autochtones, 91 % sont né·e·s au Canada et 71 % ont répondu à l’enquête en français. La plupart des jeunes trans et/ou non binaires vivent à temps plein (53 %) ou à temps partiel (37 %) dans le genre qu’iels ressentent. Cependant, certain·e·s jeunes ne vivent jamais dans leur genre ressenti (10%).

Résultat clés

  • 15 % des jeunes ont dû changer d’école à cause de leur identité de genre
  • 70 % des jeunes ont déjà évité des toilettes publiques par crainte qu’on les harcèle, qu’on les perçoive comme une personne trans ou que leur identité trans soit révelée
  • 62 % des jeunes n’ont pas réussi à nommer une seule activité dans laquelle iels excellent
  • 46 % des jeunes sont à l’aise pour discuter de leur identité trans ou non-binaire avec des professionnel·le·s de la santé

Recommandations

  1. Éduquer le personnel éducatif afin qu’iels puissent aider les élèves et enseignant·e·s à naviguer et s’adapter aux questions d’identité de genre.
  2. Mettre en place des programmes de santé mentale pour les jeunes trans et/ou non-binaires ainsi que des espaces sûrs plus visibles.
  3. Répondre au besoin urgent de toilettes et de vestiaires unisexes.

Note linguistique

Entre autres adaptations grammaticales, le pronom neutre « iel·s » remplace les pronoms « il·s » et « elle·s » afin de rendre la langue française aussi neutre que possible quand nous nous référons à des personnes. La recherche de la neutralité du genre est nécessaire pour assurer le respect de l’autodétermination des jeunes ayant participé au projet de recherche.
 
 
Télécharger

 
Cochercheure : Dr. Annie Pullen Sansfaçon
 

En 2019, 223 jeunes trans et/ou non-binaires ont répondu à l’enquête dans les provinces de l’Atlantiques. Environ 11 % se sont identifié·e·s en tant qu’Autochtones et 95 % sont né·e·s au Canada. La plupart des jeunes trans et/ou non-binaires vivent à temps plein (52 %) ou à temps partiel (37 %) dans le genre qu’iels ressentent. Cependant, certain·e·s jeunes ne vivent jamais dans leur genre ressenti (12 %).

Résultats clés

  • 22 % des jeunes ont fait une fugue
  • 30 % des jeunes ont fait une tentative de suicide au cours de la dernière année
  • 57 % des jeunes ont subi de la discrimination au Canada en raison de leur sexe.
  • 71 % des jeunes ont eu besoin des services de santé mentale ou émotionnelle au cours de la dernière année, mais n’ont pas accédé à ces soins

Recommandations

  1. Accès à des fournisseur·se·s de soins qui soient bien formé·e·s et accessibles, dans le domaine de la santé physique et mentale.
  2. Formations et programmes de soutien aux familles afin de les aider à comprendre leurs jeunes trans et/ou non-binaires et d’aider leurs jeunes à se sentir en sécurité à la maison.
  3. Formation sur l’identité de genre et les approches affirmatives du genre pour les enseignant·e·s, les conseiller·ère·s et les administrateur·rice·s afin que les écoles soient des endroits plus sûrs pour tou·te·s les élèves.

Note linguistique

Entre autres adaptations grammaticales, le pronom neutre « iel·s » remplace les pronoms « il·s » et « elle·s » afin de rendre la langue française aussi neutre que possible quand nous nous référons à des personnes. La recherche de la neutralité du genre est nécessaire pour assurer le respect de l’autodétermination des jeunes ayant participé au projet de recherche.
 
 
Télécharger

 
Cochercheure : Dr. Jacquie Gahagan
 

En 2019, 149 jeunes trans et/ou non-binaires vivant en milieu rural ont répondu à l’enquête. Environ 17 % se sont identifié·e·s en tant qu’Autochtones et 96 % sont né·e·s au Canada. La plupart des jeunes trans et/ou non-binaires vivent à temps plein (47 %) ou à temps partiel (40 %) dans le genre qu’iels ressentent. Cependant, certain·e·s jeunes ne vivent jamais dans leur genre ressenti (13 %).

Résultats clés

  • 39 % des jeunes ont subi de la cyberintimidation dans la dernière année
  • 60 % des jeunes n’ont jamais pris d’hormones pour affirmer leur genre
  • 19 % des jeunes avaient fumé une cigarette
    ans le dernier mois
  • 42 % des jeunes n’ont pas reçu des soins médicaux dont iels avaient besoin car iels ne voulaient pas que leurs parents soient au courant
  • 14 % des jeunes n’ont pas reçu des soins médicaux dont iels avaient besoin car ce service n’était pas disponible dans leur communauté

Recommandations

  1. Augmenter les compétences sur les personnes trans et/ou non-binaires des professionel·le·s de santé en milieu rural.
  2. Développer des services en ligne fiables pour aider les jeunes trans et/ou nonbinaires à accéder à des services et des informations utiles dans leur région.
  3. Créer et/ou améliorer les options de transports pour aller des milieux ruraux aux endroits où les jeunes peuvent accéder à des ressources, des médecins, et des groupes de soutien.

Note linguistique

Entre autres adaptations grammaticales, le pronom neutre « iel·s » remplace les pronoms « il·s » et « elle·s » afin de rendre la langue française aussi neutre que possible quand nous nous référons à des personnes. La recherche de la neutralité du genre est nécessaire pour assurer le respect de l’autodétermination des jeunes ayant participé au projet de recherche.
 
 
Télécharger

 
Chercheure principale : Dr. Elizabeth Saewyc