Smith A, Peled M, Poon C, Stewart D, Saewyc E, & McCreary Centre Society. (2015). We all have a role: Building social capital among youth in care. McCreary Centre Society

Research has shown the value of social capital in relation to an individual’s health, happiness, and improved life expectancy, as well as the benefits to a community of having social networks that can come together to support the community and make positive change happen.

Using data from the 2013 BC Adolescent Health Survey which was completed by over 1,000 youth who had ever been in government care, this report highlights some of the barriers that these young people face to building and maintaining social capital. It also shows the positive associations that can occur when youth have healthy relationships and supports within their family, school, community, and with peers.

The report also affirms the resilience of youth in the care of the BC government. Youth who enter government care have often experienced trauma and loss. For example, 36% of youth in care had been physically abused, 26% had been sexually abused, 30% had a friend who had attempted suicide, and 22% had a family member who had done so.

Across the domains of family, school, community, and peers, youth who had even one form of social capital reported better health than those without such relationships. However, the cumulative effect of having a greater amount of social capital across the four domains showed us that everyone has a role to play in improving connections and outcomes for youth in care.

Read more.

a place of mind, The University of British Columbia

Stigma and Resilience Among Vulnerable Youth Centre

Emergency Procedures | Accessibility | Contact UBC  | © Copyright The University of British Columbia